January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

21 01 2009
cervical-cancer1Though cervical cancer tends to occur in midlife, young women should still take precautions to prevent it. You can also get information from The Center for Disease Control’s website.

Cervical cancer occurs when the cells of the cervix become abnormal and start to develop uncontrollably, creating tumors. Once the cancer appears, it can progress through four stages, which are identified by the amount the cancer has spread.

While the cause of cervical cancer is unknown, certain factors are believed to increase one’s risk of developing cervical cancer. These include engaging in sexual activity at a young age, multiple sex partners and smoking.

More than 90 percent of women with cervical cancers are infected with human papillomavirus or HPV. It is the most significant factor for cervical cancer and is passed from one person to another during unprotected sex.

Symptoms
Early cervical cancer has no symptoms, but bleeding or spotting between periods or after intercourse can be one. The cancer is usually identified during a woman’s annual Pap smear and pelvic exam. That’s why you should start having these exams as soon as you become sexually active. Healthy young women who’ve never been sexually active should have their first annual pelvic exam by 21.

 

Ultimately, a woman with cervical cancer will notice abnormal vaginal bleeding or bloodstained discharge at unexpected times, like between menstrual periods, after intercourse or menopause. In advanced stages, there may be pain.

How to prevent it
 

 

  • Get a regular Pap smear.
  • Limit your number of sexual partners.
  • Stop smoking and stay away from second hand smoke.
  • Use a condom if you’re sexually active.
  • If you have an abnormal Pap smear, follow up.
  • Get the HPV vaccine.

For more info, check out this site:

 

 

http://www.hmc.psu.edu/healthinfo/c/cervicalcancer.htm

 

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21 01 2010
Cervical Cancer Awareness Month «

[…] here to read about cervical […]

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